In vitro ruminal degradation of neutral detergent fiber insoluble protein from tropical pastures fertilized with nitrogen

Francisco Indalecio Juárez Lagunes, Alice N. Pell, Robert W. Blake, Maribel Montero Lagunes, Juan Manuel Pinos Rodríguez

Resumen


The objective was to determine in vitro the NDF insoluble protein (NDIP) extension and degradation rate of four tropical grasses by the potential effect of N fertilization. The grasses (Andropogon gayanus, Brachiaria brizantha, Cynodon plectostachyus and Megathyrsus maximus) that grow in Mexico were used. Each grass was grown in four plots (5×5 m), fertilized (relationship equivalent to 0 and 100 kg N/ha) and clipped 35 d after the N fertilization. A complete randomized block design with factorial arrangement 4×2, and two replicates per treatment was used, where the factors were grass species and N fertilization. Non-protein nitrogen (NPN), buffer insoluble protein (IP), NDIP and acid detergent insoluble protein (ADIP) were performed. Freeze-dried samples were incubated at 0, 1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. After fermentation, the CP content of the NDF residues was determined. An exponential equation was used to determine the rate of the NDIP disappearance. There was no detectable interaction between type of grass and fertilization level. The NDIP (as %CP) averaged 35 % with a range of 10 to 60 %. The NDIP variation was primarily due to species. The extent and rates of degradation of the NDIP were 70.6 % and 7.1 %/h respectively, with no N-fertilization effect. The NDIP was degraded faster (P≤0.05) than NDF (7.7 vs 5.0 %/h). These data show that the NDIP is ruminally degraded and that this fraction significantly contributes to the rumen nitrogen supply.


Palabras clave


Tropical grasses; Degradation kinetics; Protein fractions; NDF; N fertilization.

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Referencias


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22319/rmcp.v9i3.4490

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